Afghanistan

Country Facts

DRC present since:

1999

DRC staff:

640

People in need

24,400,000

Displacement Situation

Located in Central Asia, Afghanistan forms the center of a complex migration network involving large and mixed flows of people in the region and beyond, each with a unique set of needs: people fleeing the country, refugees returning, and Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs).

An estimated 24.4 million people in Afghanistan – more than half the population - are in urgent need of humanitarian assistance. The population is trapped in deep poverty and consequences of decades of armed conflict. Their dire situation and vulnerabilities are further compounded by recurring natural hazard events.

As Afghanistan grapples with effect of the 2021 drought – the worst in 27 years - over half of the country’s population is facing acute food insecurity, and the lives of over one million children are at risk due to severe malnutrition. The humanitarian crisis is deteriorating by the day, with a devastating impact on civilians – particularly women, children, and certain ethnic minorities.

The collapse of public services, an economic vacuum due to international sanctions since August 2021 when international troops left and the Taliban took control, and further restrictions on women’s employment and mobility have launched the country into even deeper poverty.

Further complicating the situation is the presence of explosive hazard contamination across the country following more than four decades of armed conflicts. Improvised mines and explosive remnants of war continue to impact Afghan communities in both urban and rural areas.

DRC Response 

DRC has been working in Afghanistan since the 1990s through a range of humanitarian interventions in support of conflict-affected and displaced communities. Since 2011, DRC has provided multi-sector and holistic packages of emergency aid and assistance to help build the resilience among Afghans. DRC currently works in four regions of the country - West, East, South and Central - focusing on reaching underserved and hard-to-reach populations including internally displaced people, host communities, and documented as well as undocumented returnees.

As of April 2022, DRC works in 13 provinces in Afghanistan.

DRC responds to what remains a protracted humanitarian crisis through a multi-pronged approach. This means that DRC aims at addressing the critical needs of extremely vulnerable and shock-affected populations while also providing medium to longer-term solutions that focus on root causes of the crisis. To do so, DRC in Afghanistan works across the following sectors:

  • Protection
  • Economic Recovery
  • Humanitarian Disarmament & Peacebuilding
  • Shelter & Settlements

The overall goal of DRC’s multi-sector response is to promote integrated assistance that addresses the complex needs among shock and displacement-affected communities and to enable vulnerable Afghan individuals and communities find safety, claim their basic rights and pursue self-reliance.

Funding

DRC is grateful to all donors for generous support and continued commitment to our work in Afghanistan:

AHF UNOCHA · Danida · ECHO · FCDO · Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs · Ole Kirk Foundation · SIDA · UNDP · UNOPS · USAID-BHA

Contact

Gerry Garvey

Executive Director Asia and Europe

[email protected]
Picture Mikkel

Mikkel Trolle

Regional Director (Asia)

+45 33735019 [email protected]

Downloads

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Snapshots

ADSP Newsletter Q4 2020

'2020 will be remembered as a year of change and adaptation. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced changes in the way we interact with our fellow human being, across communities, and across borders. Life as we knew it seems gone!' - writes DRC Asia's Regional Director as he welcomes 2021. Read this and more from ADSP in this year's last newsletter: 1) A year of change and adaptation – seasonal greetings from the Danish Refugee Council’s Regional Director, Mikkel Trolle 2) Dreams and Hopes: Access to Education for Afghan Refugee Children Amidst COVID-19 in Balochistan – by ADSP 3) Will the Afghanistan Conference Deliver for Afghan Refugees? - by ADSP Coordinator, Evan Jones 4) Noise pollution: Consequences of living close to an airport on Afghan & Pakistani children’s hearing loss and education performance - by ADSP 5) Surviving Fear and Uncertainty: Rohingya Refugees in Malaysia - by Mixed Migration Researcher at MMC Asia, Hanh Nguyen Link: https://adsp.ngo/publications/newsletters/adsp-newsletter-q4-2020/

ADSP Newsletter Q4 2020

'2020 will be remembered as a year of change and adaptation. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced changes in the way we interact with our fellow human being, across communities, and across borders. Life as we knew it seems gone!' - writes DRC Asia's Regional Director as he welcomes 2021. Read this and more from ADSP in this year's last newsletter: 1) A year of change and adaptation – seasonal greetings from the Danish Refugee Council’s Regional Director, Mikkel Trolle 2) Dreams and Hopes: Access to Education for Afghan Refugee Children Amidst COVID-19 in Balochistan – by ADSP 3) Will the Afghanistan Conference Deliver for Afghan Refugees? - by ADSP Coordinator, Evan Jones 4) Noise pollution: Consequences of living close to an airport on Afghan & Pakistani children’s hearing loss and education performance - by ADSP 5) Surviving Fear and Uncertainty: Rohingya Refugees in Malaysia - by Mixed Migration Researcher at MMC Asia, Hanh Nguyen Link: https://adsp.ngo/publications/newsletters/adsp-newsletter-q4-2020/

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